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DSISD School Board Candidates Answer Questions

10 Qestions, 10 Answers

The Century News recently asked all four Dripping Springs ISD School Board Candidates 10 questions. Here are their responses. The candidates were asked to keep their responses under 300 words for each question.

Election day will be May 4. DSISD trustees do not represent “places,” they are at large representatives. With this election, the terms of board members Jon Thompson and Marisa Grijalva will expire.

 

DSISD Candidate Joanna Day

1. Why are you running for the DSISD School Board?

As an active member of the Dripping Springs community and mother of three, I am passionate about the future of our children. I’ve always been a strong supporter of public schools, as I've experienced firsthand the kind of support, education, and opportunity they can provide. As our district grows, we need to have actionable plans in place to ensure that we can continue to provide an excellent education to our students. We also need to ensure that we're able to attract and retain high quality, lifechanging educators. With my background as an advocate, attorney, educator, and DSISD committee member, I'm prepared for the challenge. As a member of the Board of Trustees, I'll work hard to see that every child in our district receives the support and education they need to shine their brightest.

2. Do you favor a new bond election in 2019? Why or why not?

No.  DSISD’s Long-Range Facilities Planning Committee is still collecting data and assessing the district’s needs. It is too early for the LRFPC to present a recommendation to a Bond Steering Committee.  

The 2018 bond package provided funds to expand the high school to serve 2500 students. However, by the 2024-2025 school year, Dripping Springs High School is projected to have over 3000 students, which would put it at 125% capacity. Our next bond package must be carefully crafted to address our rapidly growing student population.

We know from other communities that deciding between significantly expanding a high school or opening a second high school can be a difficult and divisive. The district needs to provide ample time for information sharing, feedback, and community consensus. A bond election in 2019 wouldn't allow us enough time for that.   

3. Should the next bond election be a single lump sum amount approval, or a line-by-line-item proposition outlining a specific dollar amount approval for each component? Yes or No, followed by your reasoning.

There’s not an easy answer to this question. A single proposition bond election can offer a district a little more flexibility. For instance, if a project included in the bond runs under budget, those additional funds can then be used for another project in the bond package. A multi-proposition bond election, or line-by-line item, helps voters understand the specifics of what they're funding when they are in the voting booth, but it can be overwhelming and is more costly than a single proposition to place on the ballot. It may also result in important programs, like agricultural or vocational education, not receiving adequate support because of their smaller constituencies. 

The Bond Steering Committee and Board of Trustees need to carefully consider student needs and community input before deciding how to structure the next bond election on the ballot. Whether single proposition or multi-proposition, transparency and communication are vital. Voters have the right to know exactly what the bond will fund.

4. What is your preferred solution to address the increase need for high school capacity?

We have two basic options: significantly expand the current high school or build a second school. Each option has its pros and cons. It's not useful for me to push a personal preference when the answer really lies with the community. It comes down to research and communication. We need to carefully assess our needs and the costs of each option. Those assessments then need to be presented to the public for dialogue and feedback. Once that happens, we'll be in a place where we can create a solution that works for Dripping Springs. 

5. Do you feel the current school administration have been good stewards of their financial resources? Why or why not?

Yes. Each year, DSISD is asked to do more with less. State and federal funding for education has declined. Though tax revenues are increasing, our district doesn't stand to significantly benefit, given our unprecedented population growth and the amount we pay into recapture (aka Robin Hood). The district must continue to engage in forward-thinking financial planning so we can continue to provide our students with a high-quality education.

6. What specific skill set would you bring to the school board?

I have a demonstrated, lifelong commitment to children, education, and public service. As a litigator and former adjunct law professor, I learned that being a strong problem solver means I must consider issues from multiple perspectives. As a compliance and ethics professional, I understand the board’s role and what makes good governance. As a DSISD volunteer and member of the Long-Range Facilities Planning Committee, I've navigated many of the complex issues facing our district. In all of these roles, I've opened lines of communication, built consensus, and enacted solutions. 

7. What would be your first priority if elected?

Our district’s mission statement is, “We partner with students, parents, and the community to provide a personal and exceptional education for every student.” Achieving this mission is my number one goal. Toward that end, I will work to ensure that students of all abilities and backgrounds have a pathway to success. Educators are, of course, a key component in this. I will advocate for our teachers to get the professional development, resources, and support they need to bring out the best in themselves and their students.  

8. What would you like voters to know about you?

That I believe in the power and promise of public schools. 

9. What was the last book you read?

“Holy Ghost” by John Sandford. 

10. What question would you have liked asked of you, that was not asked?How about, “In your opinion, what does a successful student look like?” We talk a lot about high standards and high quality education, but we rarely talk about what that looks like for individual students. I think it's more than grades, standardized test scores, or college admissions. A successful student is a hard worker. They have grit, determination, and a sense of purpose. They know their value, they've honed their abilities, and they have the confidence to follow their dreams. I think DSISD has the teachers, resources, and community support it needs to help students get to this level of success. And I'm excited for the opportunity to help make it happen.

 

DSISD Candidate Marisa Grijalva

 

1. Why are you running for the DSISD School Board?  

I am a professional educator, a former DSISD employee, and DSISD parent.  I am running for the DSISD School Board because I feel strongly that the District benefits from having an educator’s perspective represented on the Board. I was unanimously appointed to the Board in August and in the short time I have served I believe it has been valuable to have the voice of a teacher and former District employee on the Board.   

 

2. Do you favor a new bond election in 2019? Why or why not?   

There is no plan to go out for a bond in 2019.  The earliest a bond that would be recommended by the Long Range Planning Committee/Bond Steering Committee is 2020.  I will carefully consider the recommendations and the data at that time. However, based on the demographic study recently completed by Population and Survey Analysts (PASA), our district will require additional schools (capacity) to serve the growing number of students expected in the next several years.   

 

3. Should the next bond election be a single lump sum amount approval, or a line-by-line-item proposition outlining a specific dollar amount approval for each component? Yes or No, followed by your reasoning.   

I can’t make a final decision until I have the opportunity to weigh the information presented and discuss it with all board members in a meeting or series of meetings. I believe our District must continue to foster community involvement in the Long Range Planning Committee and Bond Steering Committee.  The purpose of the committee is to make a recommendation to the School Board as to how they feel the bond should be proposed. The School Board will then take the recommendation of the LRPC/BSC up for discussion. The pros to a line item bond are that people can choose needs versus wants but, that could potentially lead to inequities among the newly built schools. A lump sum would be all or nothing and could potentially assure all new schools are built equitably.   

4. What is your preferred solution to address the increase need for high school capacity?   

This is one of the most difficult and important decisions a community faces because we are all Dripping Springs Tigers.  I love the sense of community and pride that one high school brings. Every student will have an equitable opportunity to the same resources with one high school.  However, logistics such as traffic and safety worry me. I also worry that our high school would feel like a small community college and that some students will not be able to shine because of the large number of students.  I, along with the rest of the board, will have to carefully weigh all of these factors and the desires of our entire Tiger community. 

 

5. Do you feel the current school administration have been good stewards of their financial resources? Why or why not?  

I do believe administration has managed our financial resources well. However, there is always room for improvement.  The past several months, I have taken in a significant amount of information as an appointed School Board member. I have learned that things aren’t as simple as they seem. Our district, like many others, is working on a tight budget due to the State’s recapture. I would like to see funds allocated toward hiring more teachers such as special education or floating teachers to support all grade levels. I believe our school administration are visionary thinkers and have kept our district ahead of an evolving curve.   

 

6. What specific skill set would you bring to the school board?   

I bring the perspective of an educator and an advocate for our children. No other candidate currently running has the same insight into the inner workings of our district. I have walked the halls as a caretaker of our children and I also understand the challenges that our teachers and administrators go through on a daily basis. 

 

7. What would be your first priority if elected? 

My first priority is to assure that our district implements a Social Emotional Learning plan at all education levels. I believe this goes hand in hand with school security to help identify individuals before they are in crisis.  Secondly, I would like to continue working with the Board to ensure that our constituents have a platform to voice opinions regarding future bond proposals. Lastly, I am focused on assuring our teachers feel supported in the classroom (special ed., floating grade level teachers, part-time interventionists, school counselors) by accounting for available resources at their or the administration’s disposal. 

8. What would you like voters to know about you? 

I am running for the Board from a desire to serve all children. Running for the school board is not a stepping stone for a future political position or because of a particular special interest.  I feel that my skill set would be a unique asset to the current Board because it represents the staff’s perspectives and complements the other talents currently represented on the Board. 

 

9. What was the last book you read?  

I just finished re-reading “The Parent Gap” by Randi Rubenstein and “What School Boards Can Do” by Donald R. McAdams. 

 

10. What question would you have liked asked of you, that was not asked?

“What do you feel about tax money going to charter schools?”  The reasoning behind this question is that charter schools are not held to the same accountability and transparency standards as public schools.  As a Public School Board member I find it important to support our public education system.

 

 

DSISD Candidate Kara Mayfield

 

1. Why are you running for the DSISD School Board? 

 I am running for DSISD school board because I believe it is important to serve the community you live in and I value the importance of our youth and our future. I have always worked in a role where I am serving others and I would like to continue that mission by serving those in the Dripping Springs School District.  It is important to me to work with all of those involved in our school district, including parents, teachers, students, administrators and community leaders to garner the best possible outcome for our students in DSISD. 

Additionally, one of my greatest strengths is connecting the puzzle pieces of a community for the best possible outcome, and it would be my honor to lend those skills I possess to the district. It is a priority for me to ensure our children feel safe, valued and have the skill set necessary to reach their goals.  By working together, we can help the students of DSISD reach their aspirations and thereby aid in building the future of this community, this state and our nation. I would be honored to serve the students of the Dripping Springs School District and work with the district in preparing our children for their future.  

 

2. Do you favor a new bond election in 2019? Why or why not?

 A bond election in 2019 would not allow for appropriate community input and we must work together in order to prepare for any future bond.  The school district needs to be transparent in the needs of the district so community leaders, parents, students, and teachers can bring their concerns forth and we can work together to find a solution for our children. I do not believe it would be in the best interest of the school district to have a bond election in 2019 unless there was an urgent matter or emergency item that needs to be addressed immediately by the school district.  

 

3. Should the next bond election be a single lump sum amount approval, or a line-by-line-item proposition outlining a specific dollar amount approval for each component? Yes or No, followed by your reasoning.

In theory, a line by line item proposition makes more sense but, if that line by line proposition was too lengthy or cumbersome, I fear people would not vote on the items further down on the ballot.  This would leave our school district in a bind and many problems would remain for the district which would ultimately lead to another election to consider those items.  Additional elections could lead to voter apathy and there is a cost to the the district for holding an election which impacts the district’s budget. 

But I also worry that a “one and done” lump sum bond election leaves many people in the community, parents and leaders feeling as if they were given no choice and feeling pressured to vote in favor of a bond that they don’t necessarily agree with in order to secure their child’s education.  This option often leaves the community feeling upset and as if their voice doesn’t matter.  

I think the answer lies somewhere in the middle.  We must work together to find a way to trust one another and work with one another so either the lump sum proposition or the line by line proposition will work best for the students of the district.  If we work together leading up to the bond election, with the community and the district working and listening to one another, either of these options can work for our community, for our school district and most importantly for our students and children.  

 

4. What is your preferred solution to address the increase need for high school capacity?

First and foremost, we need greater feedback in solving this issue from our community and from our school district.  We need to find greater examples from other communities in Texas faced with similar situations in the past to evaluate the decisions made by those communities whom were in similar growth patterns ten or twenty years ago.  Some of the top rated ISD’s with a single high school have not been evaluated by DSISD.  We need to look at all options, not just the preferred options of a few.  

We need to consider the permits being authorized by the City of Dripping Springs to look closely at the type of housing this community will be authorizing. Is the City of Dripping Springs looking at more single-family homes or multi-family housing including apartments and condos.  These decisions made by the City will impact the school district, the community and ultimately our students.  

My preferred solution for addressing high school capacity starts with working and listening to our community.  So far, these discussions have been presentations to the community and not the community speaking to the district.  The district needs to answer the questions coming from the community and all of us need to work on the path of discovery together.  This does not need to be a town hall or an angry mob but allowing the community to have their own questions answered, beyond a survey or a presentation.  If the community is heard it allows the community to feel valued and their input acknowledged and answered prior to a vote on a future bond.  This communication allows the community input on solving the high school capacity problem within this school district.  

 

 

5. Do you feel the current school administration have been good stewards of their financial resources? Why or why not? 

Yes, I think the current school administration has been good stewards of the finances and have looked at creative solutions for meeting the financial needs of the district.  But there is always room for improvement including greater transparency and explanation of critical expenses that the community may not understand or may not agree with an expenditure for the district. 

I do not believe everyone is going to agree with every element of the budget, bond or decisions made by the district but DSISD needs to find ways to be more transparent with the community, parents and district so the community understands the needs of the district and the district understands where frustration exists in the community.  

If the school administration works to educate and listen to the community on the needs of the district, how they are trying to solve the problems they are faced with and accept feedback from the community on these needs the community is more likely to reciprocate.  

 

6. What specific skill set would you bring to the school board?

Throughout my professional career, I have worked to solve problems for the people and communities I have worked with and been a part of.  I believe there is always a solution to a problem, although it is not always the simplest or easiest answer.   It is important to think “outside the box” to find answers and I am willing and prepared to engage, listen and collaborate with others to find the best solutions to the issues impacting our children and students within DSISD.  

In addition to being determined to solving problems, I have a broad base of knowledge which is an asset to this position.  My knowledge base includes working in public policy, understanding legislation and knowing the players at the state and federal level, being a small business owner, working in private business partnerships and being a licensed attorney with the State of Texas.  My career has always focused on working on a wide range of issues, analyzing those issues and seeking a solution to the problems presented.  Each of these skill sets will come in to play when working as a Trustee of the DSISD School Board and working with our students, parents, teachers and community.  

 

7. What would be your first priority if elected? 

One of my first priorities would be listening to our parents and students regarding the issues impacting them and how solutions are being / or not being met to solve the problems they are facing within our school district.  

For instance, vaping has been deemed a national epidemic and is greatly impacting the students within our schools.  We need to work together to find a solution to this problem and investigate the underlying issues as to why students in DSISD are giving in to this pressure to vape.  Many students and parents do not understand the significant negative consequences to using these products that extend beyond the health of the student but could impact them negatively for years to come if they receive a citation and ordered to come before a judge.    

Another priority for me would be to review the policy of the school district as to bullying and why each campus is not following the same procedural methods throughout the district to stop this dangerous pattern of aggression to other students.  I would embrace families and students who are struggling with bullying and feel isolated and do not know where to seek assistance once the school turns a blind eye to the emotional and physical harm that is occurring to their child, a student of our district.  

I would work with the parents, teachers and students to determine what is creating the increase in anxiety with our students.   It is important for each of us to determine if all three of these issues previously mentioned are tied to one another and how can we work together to serve our students not only in preparing them educationally but also with their emotional well-being as they progress from elementary to middle school and ultimately to high school.  

 

8. What would you like voters to know about you?

I would like voters to know that I am an individual who is dedicated, a hard worker, a team player but I am NOT afraid to ask the hard questions and seek solutions to unpopular problems.  I am here to solve problems for our district and our students, and  I want to hear from parents, students, teachers, administrators and the community to solve the problems this district is facing.  I will not take the first answer as the only answer. I will ask questions and bring new conversations and discussion points to the trustees.  I will use my skill set of “connecting the pieces of the puzzle” to this role and a simple solution will not be sought.  

Regarding my background,  I have resided in this district for the last 12 years, I am married to a teacher and we have one child who is a student in the district.  I have worked for the U.S. Senate, the Texas House of Representatives on Public Education, a U. S. Congressman and have worked in the private sector, as well as for a non-profit.  I am a licensed attorney in the State of Texas and serve as an Executive Director for an association.  

I am persistent, I seek justice for all, and I am tenacious when solving problems. I will work for this community; I will listen to this community and I will learn from this community.  Together we can solve the problems this district is facing and together we will make DSISD the best district in the state of Texas. 

 

9. What was the last book you read?

The last book I read was “Charlotte’s Web” with my son.  Reading classic books with him is an important goal of mine and I love learning from him and seeing his excitement to classic books.  It is fun to see how he loves these great books, just as I did when I was younger, even though so much has changed and evolved over the last forty years.   

The last book I read for myself was the “Plant Paradox”.  An interesting book showing me how adjusting food decision in one’s life can make life long changes to the body and help heal itself.  I am always willing to work with traditional medicine and my doctors but also willing to seek out solutions that are sometimes thought to be “outside the box”.  One lesson in life I have learned, is that you must be your own best advocate. 

 

10. What question would you have liked asked of you, that was not asked? 

I think the question missing is “How Will You Work with the School District and the Existing School Board Trustees?” It is important for our community, parents and teachers to know that if I am elected I will value the opinions of the existing school board but I will be a new voice, new “blood” per se, to the board working to bring forth new ideas, new questions and new comments for each of us to consider.  I am not seeking this position of school board trustee with an agenda in mind but rather to serve our parents, our students, and this community.  We need to make sure our community feels valued and heard and I believe the school district and school board need to work together to make sure the community can voice their opinion and visit with them so we can find common ground to work together.  

I look forward to the opportunity to work with our school board trustees, to learn from them and challenge them with new ideas, creative thinking and convey concerns from the community, parents and students so those issues can be addressed. By all of us working together we will make this district stronger and ALL of our students even more successful.  

 

 

DSISD Candidate Rob Satterfield

 

1. Why are you running for the DSISD School Board?

I have a passion for serving and desire to impact the lives of students by advocating for the safest and best possible education for every child.  Growing up, my role models were my family, teachers (including my own mother) and coaches.  Their dedication and positive impact inspired me to give back to my community. I also have two children that currently attend DSISD schools.   I want to see them and all DSISD students thrive and reach their full potential.  I will be an advocate for educational excellence and learning environments where students are valued, supported and safe.  I desire to serve our students, teachers and community with the highest integrity and to be an effective steward of public trust.  One of the top priorities currently facing DSISD is effectively managing rapid population growth.  We must seek solutions that preserve educational excellence while advocating for transparency, accountability and responsible stewardship of tax dollars.  My goal is to pro-actively seek feedback and input from all stakeholders and seek to establish broad consensus.  One specific way to increase fiscal accountability and transparency is to create a bond oversight committee (BOC).

 

2. Do you favor a new bond election in 2019? Why or why not?

In order to answer this question, I would need more information and clarification.  All of the information communicated about timetables at the Long-Range Facilities Planning Committee (LRFPC) meetings to date have indicated that November 2020 would be the earliest a bond could be called. The community just passed a $32 million dollar bond in last year’s May 2018 bond election by a very small margin and I don’t have any knowledge that another bond referendum is needed again this year.  I believe that before bond referendums are brought to the community for a vote there should first be broad consensus.  This was not the case with the 2018 bond.  When considering bonds in the future, the school board and administration should seek to authentically involve and engage the community in the process every step of the way.  The more transparency the better.  As the chair of the School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) for the last two years, I have found most community feedback centers around the lack of clear, consistent and transparent communication.  Before putting a new bond referendum to the public for a vote, we must first clearly communicate the long term plan with two or three options that include facility renderings and detailed budgets and allow the community to vote to determine the best option to put forth.  

 

3. Should the next bond election be a single lump sum amount approval, or a line-by-line-item proposition outlining a specific dollar amount approval for each component? Yes or No, followed by your reasoning.

The next bond election should be a line-by-line-item proposition outlining the specific dollar amount approval for each component.  This accomplishes greater transparency for the hard working tax payers in this community.  This line item method also assists in the process of identifying wants versus needs. I strongly support and will advocate for establishing a bond oversight committee (BOC).  This committee must have diverse membership, including stakeholders who opposed the May 2018 bond. The BOC should include members of the community that can offer diverse perspectives while at the same time have no conflicts of interest or development interests in the community. It would be advisable to also include community members with accounting and finance backgrounds. 

 

4. What is your preferred solution to address the increase need for high school capacity?

I believe there are at least three clear options for a path forward to address the need for increased high school capacity in the future.  The first option is to build a second high school on the 150 acre district owned property at the intersection of Sawyer Ranch Road and Darden Hill Road (on the south side of Darden Hill Road).  The second option is to work with developers to donate land inside of neighborhoods and implement the neighborhood schools concept.  The third clear option involves a land swap with Dripping Springs Youth Sports Association (DSYSA).  This would provide additional land at Dripping Springs High School (DSHS) with which to build a 9th grade center and manage growth conservatively.  We must closely review and analyze student enrollment data in order to make sound growth projections and avoid spending tax payer dollars unnecessarily.  The district must work closely and collaboratively with all stakeholders to ensure there is broad consensus before moving forward with a plan to manage future growth at the high school level.  The decision the community makes should be taken very seriously as it will have a lasting social and financial impact for many years to come. The district has reconvened the Long-Range Facilities Planning Committee (LRFPC) in November 2018.  I attended the last meeting in February where we discussed school size and school options. This committee meets on a regular basis and all community members are welcome and encouraged to attend and engage in the process.  This process is just beginning and there is still a lot of work to be done as each of the various options must be closely analyzed in order to come up with the best possible solution.

 

5. Do you feel the current school administration have been good stewards of their financial resources? Why or why not?

There are always opportunities to look closely at a budget as large as DSISD’s and trim unnecessary spending.  Students and teachers should always be our district's top priority.  According to data from the Texas Comptroller, our district—following the passage of the 2018 Bond—has more per-student tax-supported debt than 98% of school districts in the entire state of Texas.   DSISD's May 2018 bond increased our total tax supported debt by 45%, adding $132 million to our current total tax supported debt balance of $295 million.  The tax ramifications of additional debt obligations and service should be something that we carefully consider moving forward.  We must be fiscally responsible and welcome fiscal accountability in order to manage growth effectively and efficiently.  Debt and spending are what drive school taxes.  The school board controls both the budget and revenue. They are responsible for determining the amount of revenue brought in.  DSISD must communicate openly and clearly and seek to tell the whole financial story. When the district proposes new bonds it’s important to disclose the estimated tax impact on the average residence, along with the proposed tax rate in order for residents to make fully informed voting decisions.  For example, the 2018 bond came with a 6% tax increase for the average residence, while the tax rate remained the same.   Currently annual tax increases are outpacing growth.  I’m afraid if the current taxing trend continues our teachers, clergy, fire fighters and police will not be able to afford to live in the district.  In addition, longtime residents may find themselves taxed out of their homes. 

 

6. What specific skill set would you bring to the school board?

I currently serve on a board of trustees for a non-profit.  I have also served under the oversight of a board of trustees.  I have a first-hand working understanding of budgets and have been a strong advocate for fiscal responsibility and accountability in all of the organizations I have served.  I have been successful in cutting expenses while increasing productivity. Having lived overseas and holding a Masters of Arts in Intercultural Studies, I bring a unique perspective to the school board.  I have experienced first-hand what it is like to feel welcomed, valued and accepted overseas and I want to make sure that every child and community member feels welcomed, valued and accepted by Dripping Springs ISD.  I believe that all cultures are worthy in their own right and are of equal value.  Finally, I have had the privilege of serving as the chair of the Student Health Advisory Council (SHAC) for the last two years.  This service opportunity has provided me with invaluable experience as this district advisory committee seeks to strengthen ties between school and community and includes parents, administrators and members of the community. I have enjoyed working with committee members to collaborate and produce annual reports that include specific recommendations to the school board regarding health/safety/security and health education instruction. 

 

7. What would be your first priority if elected?

My top priority would be to gain a deeper understanding regarding community relationships and perceptions, finances, curriculum, teacher morale and student achievement and needs.  A top priority currently facing DSISD is safety.  I highly recommend DSISD conduct thorough safety assessments of all existing facilities by multiple branches of law enforcement and consultants.  This will allow us to develop a comprehensive safety evaluation with recommendations that can be utilized to make critical decisions moving forward for both existing and new facilities.  Another priority is to identify and create opportunities for more community involvement and feedback concerning long term planning. I want to work closely with all stakeholders, including community members, district and campus administration, teachers and students to develop the best plan forward to manage the rapid district growth.  Consistent and clear communication are key to the district’s success moving forward.  

 

8. What would you like voters to know about you?

Some of my most influential mentors and role models were teachers and coaches. In fact, my mom is a retired sixth grade teacher.  I can still vividly remember their heart for my education and for maturing me in my character and growing my leadership skills. Their positive influence & support has impacted me greatly.  It has inspired me and ignited within me a desire to give back and impact Dripping Springs in the same way. My desire is to serve, to be a blessing to others and to positively impact our community’s children in their education while helping them grow in character and leadership.    I have been married to my wife, Kristie, for 15 years and we have two children. Our daughter is a sixth grader at Dripping Springs Middle School and our son is a fourth grader at Dripping Springs Elementary School.  I am a DSYSA football, basketball, and baseball coach.  I enjoy sports and working with children to develop sportsmanship, athletic skills, teamwork, leadership and life-skills such as grit and determination. 

 

9. What was the last book you read?

The last book I read was The Minister As Shepherd by Charles Jefferson.  The absolute best leader that ever walked the earth was a sacrificial servant.  I desire to use my gifts and skills to serve and help others.  My heart is to be a servant leader that works with the community and the district to do what’s in the best interest of our children.  A humble shepherd serves, leads, protects and provides.  All of these qualities are necessary for the flock to thrive.

 

10. What question would you have liked asked of you, that was not asked?

I love Texas.  I love Dripping Springs.  I love DSISD.  Our family has been so blessed to be a part of this community.  These were fantastic questions.  They were thought provoking and my answers truly show who I am as a candidate.  In elections, candidates can be tempted to appeal to as many people as possible.  I was authentic, transparent and honest in my responses so that community members can cast their vote with as much knowledge as possible about my qualifications and views.

 

QUESTIONS END

 

Dripping Springs Century-News

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Dripping Springs, Texas 78620

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